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A GREAT READ FROM GRAHAM HICKS

In his emergency pandemic, the federal government says it will spend about $82 billion over and above its 2020-21 $180 billion budget.

In Alberta, the province pegs the direct cost of fighting the pandemic at $500 million, above and beyond its $56 billion 2020-21 budget.

On top of that $500 million,  Alberta Premier Jason Kenney has announced a provincial government  “investment” (i.e. repayable if all goes well) of $1.5 billion to get TC Energy’s Keystone XL pipeline built, plus $6 billion in loan guarantees, i.e. if TC Energy goes bankrupt, the government of Alberta is on the hook to pay its outstanding bills.

Where does all this money come from?

  Click here for Sun column REX MURPHY’S SATURDAY COLUMN

It has always been true that a country is most secure when its functioning is least contingent on external sources. To the degree that it is possible, to provide for itself all which is necessary for that functioning, is an undebatable proposition.

It’s as old as the fine axiom of “stand on your own two feet.” Others’ limbs will not support you when it most matters. But here in Canada we have displaced that idea, shackled those industries central to the country’s capacity to own itself. And we have neglected and even disparaged the most central enterprises, diminished the respect for enterprise itself, leaving us open and vulnerable to factors over which we have no influence.

It has always been true that a country is most secure when its functioning is least contingent on external sources. To the degree that it is possible, to provide for itself all which is necessary for that functioning, is an undebatable proposition.

It’s as old as the fine axiom of “stand on your own two feet.” Others’ limbs will not support you when it most matters. But here in Canada we have displaced that idea, shackled those industries central to the country’s capacity to own itself. And we have neglected and even disparaged the most central enterprises, diminished the respect for enterprise itself, leaving us open and vulnerable to factors over which we have no influence.

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